Investors

Investors say Trump properties are worthless until his name is removed

The Week

It’s been 1 year since Trump infamously tweeted the ‘coronavirus is very much under control’ in the U.S.

Well, that didn’t age well. It’s now been one year since former President Donald Trump infamously tweeted that the “coronavirus is very much under control” in the United States. A year ago today pic.twitter.com/VqvlLW572d — Dan Diamond (@ddiamond) February 24, 2021 At that point, a search through the Trump Twitter Archive reveals, Trump had been discussing the virus publicly, but mostly in the context of how China was dealing with it; in those days, Trump was still speaking glowingly of President Xi Jinping’s response. The Feb. 24 tweet was one of the earliest references Trump made to the virus’ presence in the United States, and certainly his most direct about its potential effect on the country. The comment looks quite jarring in hindsight — earlier this week the U.S. recorded its 500,000th COVID-19 death, and the pandemic remains a serious public health threat, although there are now signs of hope in the form of steadily declining cases and increasing vaccinations. Trump was far from the only person to downplay the risk of the virus in the U.S. in February 2020, but he did continue to send mixed messages about its danger throughout the rest of his presidency, even after he was infected himself. More stories from theweek.comThe MyPillow guy might be Trump’s ultimate chumpBiden nominates postal board slate that could oust Louis DeJoy after DeJoy vows to stay put5 cartoons about Andrew Cuomo’s nursing home scandal

Axios

Donald Trump Jr. deposed in D.C. attorney general probe of inaugural committee

Donald Trump Jr. was deposed on Feb. 11 as part of a lawsuit by D.C. Attorney General Karl Racine, who alleged last year that former President Trump’s inaugural committee coordinated with the Trump Organization to “grossly overpay” for event space at its D.C. hotel.Details: Racine alleges that in the course of his investigation, he uncovered a second instance in which the inaugural committee improperly spent funds — on a contract the Trump Organization signed with the Loews Madison Hotel for a block of rooms during the 2017 inauguration.Get market news worthy of your time with Axios Markets. Subscribe for free.The filing alleges that a former executive assistant to Donald Trump Jr. was the point of contact for the contract and that the inaugural committee paid an invoice for the Loews room block for almost $50,000.”Donald Trump, Jr.’s testimony at his February 11, 2021 deposition raised further questions about the nature of the Loews Madison invoice and revealed evidence that Defendants had not yet produced to the District,” the filing states.Ivanka Trump, inaugural committee chair Tom Barrack, and deputy chair Rick Gates have also sat for depositions, according to the filing.The big picture: Former President Trump and his business is facing legal scrutiny in multiple jurisdictions, including a criminal investigation out of the Manhattan district attorney’s office that is said to be examining possible tax and bank-related fraud.Read the filing.Like this article? Get more from Axios and subscribe to Axios Markets for free.

Associated Press

Oklahoma man released early from prison accused in 3 deaths

An Oklahoma man who had been released early from prison in January as part of a mass commutation effort is now accused of three killings, including the death of a neighbor whose heart he cut out, authorities said. A judge denied bail Tuesday for Lawrence Paul Anderson, who faces three counts of first-degree murder, one count of assault and one count of maiming for the attack this month in Chickasha, about 35 miles (55 kilometers) southwest of Oklahoma City. According to the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation, Anderson is accused of killing Andrea Lynn Blankenship, 41, and cutting out her heart.

The Week

Board members of Texas grid operator resign following blackouts

Five members of the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) board plan on resigning Wednesday, following last week’s power outages amid a brutal winter storm. All five of the members live outside Texas, as does a sixth person who has withdrawn his application to the board, The Texas Tribune reports. A nonprofit, ERCOT manages and operates the electricity grid for most of Texas. During last week’s deadly storm, millions of Texas went without power, some for several days. In the wake of the mass power outage, ERCOT officials revealed during a press conference that several board members were being harassed by the public after it was reported that they did not live in Texas. ERCOT, which is overseen by Texas’ Public Utility Commission, has a 15-member board. Among those resigning are chairwoman Sally Talberg, vice chairman Peter Cramton, and Raymond Hepper, human resources and governance committee chair. Talberg, a former state utility regulator, lives in Michigan, while Cramton, a professor of economics at the University of Cologne and the University of Maryland, lives in Germany. Texas Gov. Greg Abbott (R) said he welcomes the resignations. “The lack of preparedness and transparency at ERCOT is unacceptable,” he said. “We will ensure that the disastrous events of last week are never repeated.” More stories from theweek.comThe MyPillow guy might be Trump’s ultimate chumpBiden nominates postal board slate that could oust Louis DeJoy after DeJoy vows to stay putIt’s been 1 year since Trump infamously tweeted the ‘coronavirus is very much under control’ in the U.S.

The Daily Beast

Jimmy Kimmel Roasts Rudy Giuliani Over Silly Dominion Lawsuit-Dodging

ABCOn Tuesday night, The Late Show’s Stephen Colbert dragged the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) for branding this year’s edition “America Uncanceled” and then canceling a speaker over his history of anti-Semitic comments. And Jimmy Kimmel joined in on the fun—but also set his sights on someone who’s become such a colossal embarrassment he won’t be speaking at CPAC: Rudy Giuliani, the president’s ex-attorney who once married his cousin. “Rudy Giuliani isn’t on the list at CPAC. He is no longer representing Donald Trump, and his next client could be himself,” cracked Kimmel. “Last month, Rudy got hit with a $1.3 billion lawsuit from Dominion Voting Systems. They’re suing him for spreading misinformation about their machines, and apparently, they had a heck of a time serving him with papers.”Yes, Dominion filed a whopping $1.3 billion lawsuit against Giuliani—citing 50 “demonstrably false” (Dominion’s words) claims he made that their voting machines flipped votes from Trump to Biden—and even tied Giuliani’s baseless claims about rigged Dominion machines to the rioters who stormed the Capitol on Jan. 6, referencing a speech that Giuliani gave earlier that day in the lawsuit.“Having been deceived by Giuliani and his allies into thinking that they were not criminals — but patriots ‘Defend[ing] the Republic’ from Dominion and its co-conspirators — they then bragged about their involvement in the crime on social media,” the lawsuit read.And Giuliani—of Borat 2, Four Seasons Total Landscaping, leaking head, and courtroom-farting fame—has continued to embarrass himself during the Dominion saga. According to a report in the New York Daily News, Dominion struggled to serve Giuliani with the 107-page lawsuit. First, he refused to receive it by email, and it took them a week to try to serve Giuliani in person.Stephen Colbert Hammers ‘America Uncanceled’ CPAC for Canceling Speaker“A doorman, knowing process servers were looking for Giuliani, locked the door to the building whenever the former mayor entered the lobby,” reported the Daily News. “On Feb. 7, a pair of process servers and Giuliani got into an awkward standoff during a nasty winter storm. That morning, the doorman to the building waved to a Ford Explorer SUV parked down the street. Giuliani got in the passenger seat and closed the SUV door as a process server lunged forward with a bag full of documents.”Then, as Kimmel elaborated, something truly ridiculous happened: “At one point, the server jammed the lawsuit into the door of an SUV Giuliani got into, but Rudy’s doorman grabbed an umbrella and pried it out onto the ground,” Kimmel explained, adding, “You know, if they really want to get those papers to Rudy, they should’ve just had Borat’s daughter stuff them in his pants.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.

Tribune Publishing

Tampa International Airport to launch direct flights to Savannah, Ga.

Soon departing from Tampa International Airport: direct flight to Savannah, Ga. Silver Airways announced this week that it will begin twice-weekly flights from Tampa to Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport in April. It’s the first time the airport has had direct service to the market. Silver is also adding a route between Savannah and Fort Lauderdale. “Both airports have been unserved …

Well, that didn’t age well. It’s now been one year since former President Donald Trump infamously tweeted that the “coronavirus is very much under control” in the United States. A year ago today pic.twitter.com/VqvlLW572d — Dan Diamond (@ddiamond) February 24, 2021 At that point, a search through the Trump Twitter Archive reveals, Trump had been discussing the virus publicly, but mostly in the context of how China was dealing with it; in those days, Trump was still speaking glowingly of President Xi Jinping’s response. The Feb. 24 tweet was one of the earliest references Trump made to the virus’ presence in the United States, and certainly his most direct about its potential effect on the country. The comment looks quite jarring in hindsight — earlier this week the U.S. recorded its 500,000th COVID-19 death, and the pandemic remains a serious public health threat, although there are now signs of hope in the form of steadily declining cases and increasing vaccinations. Trump was far from the only person to downplay the risk of the virus in the U.S. in February 2020, but he did continue to send mixed messages about its danger throughout the rest of his presidency, even after he was infected himself. More stories from theweek.comThe MyPillow guy might be Trump’s ultimate chumpBiden nominates postal board slate that could oust Louis DeJoy after DeJoy vows to stay put5 cartoons about Andrew Cuomo’s nursing home scandal

Source: https://news.yahoo.com/investors-trump-properties-worthless-until-155400938.html

Donovan Larsen

Donovan is a columnist and associate editor at the Dark News. He has written on everything from the politics to diversity issues in the workplace.

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button